Aspire2bLean Blog

Lean Consulting for Corporates and SME's.

-- MOVE AWAY FROM THE GREY --

Lean in Retail

 

I stumbled across a great article about Aldi and their continued pursuit of Lean. The article makes it very clear that Lean is not just for manufacturing, and although Lean may have lost some profile over the last few years it still very much has resonance today. Some say that Aldi’s current success is down to its models and market positioning. That is true, but how did they get to that position ? Lean thinking and principles which are referenced in the article allow businesses to get to a competitive market position. All too often Lean is just perceived about removing unnecessary waste and cost, but effective Lean drives flexibility, adaptability and agility. These are the key elements that allow businesses to have a strong market position. The article also references how Aldi have engaged their workforce, to increase their Lean bandwidth and achieve even more. Aldi also multi-skill their workforce to allow maximum flexibility, alleviate boredom and improve overall effectiveness. This is exactly what the manufacturing sector have been doing for a couple of decades. With the pressure on the retail sector, and the relentless competition, one may think that the staff remuneration would be low. However, Aldi also pay above the average sector pay. These savings  allow Aldi to pay above market rates, and entice the most capable staff. They have an empowered and a motivated workforce to deliver on future improvements, and cost savings. The improvement cycle repeats itself. They will also be taking waste out of the all their administrative processes . A Lean mindset drives the removal of waste everywhere.

Aldi know their customers, and what drives them to there stores, which is both quality and value. They keep their product range / variants to what the customers will buy. This is analogous to a manufacturing operation optimising their SKU’s to reduce unnecessary processing and raw material costs. Again this is classic Lean. Aldi use this practice to gain procurement leverage with their suppliers and pass the savings on to their customers. This creates loyalty with their customers. Some of their competitors open for long hours. As they know their customers well, and there is no need for them to be open for the hours that some of their competitors are. This saves time, salaries, energy cost and even wear and tear on assets.

Aldi  are also connected to the community and fund local events. This is yet another side benefit that builds further brand equity. Aldi are reaping the huge benefits of Lean, and the self-fulfilling circular improvements that Lean creates.

 

 

 

Taking “Waste” out of Administrative Processes

There has considerable focus on “Manufacturing” processes in the context of “Lean” & “Waste”. When people have time to think, they realise there is real “Waste” in all of the administrative processes. This is sometimes forgotten. If we start to think about some of the huge financial decisions that are taken daily by governments and corporations, these all have complex processes and analytics that sit behind them. The impacts of failures or defects can run into billions. The concept of the “8 wastes” has been well established for manufacturing and engineering for decades. We can start to think about applying these “challenges” or concepts to administration. As an example, “Defects” ( 8 Waste #1) can apply in an administration process. This can be as simple as a miss typed letter or fax, and adding or removing a zero to a deal can have an enormous impact. Even if this is caught before it is too late, there has been a delay in the process, which in itself can have a financial impact. This is in addition to the time associated with getting it corrected. Every error has a waste, a touch point by an individual, and a multiplier associated with all those involved.  Data in a recent CNBC article suggests that spreadsheet errors can cost billions. This is a huge opportunity for standardisation, which is one of the cornerstones of “Lean Thinking”. Furthermore, delayed or inefficient decision making can cost vast sums of money. This is another opportunity for a lean approach. Poor decision making processes usually encompass at least seven of the eight wastes, if not all of them. Think of the “Waiting Time” ( 8 Waste #3), and how that has a huge negative effect on the decision making process.  However, help is at hand. By following lean principles/approaches and working on the “Waste Free” mindset, these associated losses can be significantly reduced or eliminated. We managed to significantly improve the decision making processes on multi-million CAPEX expenditures for a major UKR conglomerate back in 2014 with a lean approach. Decisions were taken more rapidly, and unnecessary recycles avoided.

I refer to my recent blog post on decision making in the post “Brexit” environment, the opportunities for better and more sustainable results through effective decision making are immense.